iPhone 6 Plus Vs Samsung Galaxy Note 4

September 10th, 2014 No comments

IP6vsN4

iPhone 6 Plus Samsung Galaxy Note 4
Display 5.5-inch 1080p LCD 5.7-inch Quad HD Super AMOLED (2,560×1,440)
Pixel density 401 ppi 515 ppi
Dimensions 6.2 x 3.1 x 0.28 inches (158.1 x 77.8 x 7.1 mm) 6 x 3.1 x 0.34 inches (153.5 by 78.6 by 8.5 mm)
Weight 6.1 ounces (172 g) 6.2 ounces (176 g)
OS iOS 8 Android 4.4, TouchWiz
Camera, video 8-megapixel, 1080p HD video 16-megapixel, 4K video (3,840×2,160)
Front-facing camera 1.2-megapixel, 720p HD 3.7-megapixel
Processor A8 with M8 co-processor 2.7GHz Snapdragon 805 or 1.9GHz octa-core chipset
RAM N/A 3GB
Capacity 16GB, 64GB, 128 GB 32GB
Extra storage None Up to 64GB
Battery Up to 12 hours (LTE); embedded 3,300mAh; removable
Bluetooth 4.0 Low Energy 4.0 Low Energy
NFC Yes Yes
Waterproof No No
Colors Silver, gold, gray White, black, gold, pink
Extras Apple Pay, Touch ID fingerprint scanner Heart-rate monitor, fingerprint scanner, stylus
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Nexus 7 & Chromecast Press Event – 7/24/13

August 2nd, 2013 No comments
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Canon EOS 100D / Rebel SL1 preview

March 22nd, 2013 No comments
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Canon EOS 700D / Rebel T5i preview

March 22nd, 2013 No comments
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Gmail unveiled an update to its Android app Monday

March 19th, 2013 No comments

Gmail unveiled an update to its Android app Monday, enabling users to reply, archive and search messages more efficiently.

Those who own a device running Android 4.1 (Jelly Bean) and up, can now reply and archive messages straight from their notifications by making a quick selection. In a blog post, Google software engineer Andy Huang includes an example of the update, seen below.

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Operating System Market Share in the Maldives from 2010-2013

March 17th, 2013 2 comments

Web Browsers in Maldives

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Samsung Galaxy S4 vs. iPhone 5, HTC One, and BlackBerry Z10

March 15th, 2013 1 comment

Screen Shot 2013-03-15 at 10.24.36 AM

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Interview to Geeklyzer

January 19th, 2013 No comments
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Lexar 256GB SDXC Memory Card Professional Class 10 UHS-I

January 10th, 2013 No comments

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The Lexar 256GB SDXC Memory Card Professional Class 10 UHS-I is a high-performance memory card. It utilizes UHS-I technology for a super-fast 400x speed rating, allowing for 60MB/s maximum read speed. It’s got a Class 10 rating and a maximum write speed of 20MB/s. The card is great for capturing high-quality still photos and 1080p HD video with any SDXC-compatible camera, and satisfies the needs of pro photographers and videographers. Image Rescue 4 software is available via download, enabling you to recover lost or accidentally deleted photo and video files. Also enjoy free professional tech support. The card is backed by a lifetime limited warranty.

High-Speed Performance Accelerates Workflow

Utilizes UHS-I technology for a super-fast 400x speed rating, allowing for 60MB/s maximum read speed. Card has a Class 10 rating and maximum write speed of 20MB/s
Great for capturing high-quality still photos and 1080p HD video with any SDHC-compatible camera, and satisfies the needs of pro photographers and videographers
When using a USB 3.0 card reader, you’ll speed through post-production with blazing-fast card-to-computer file transfer, allowing you to get back behind the camera faster

Valuable Downloadable Software

Image Rescue 4 software is available via download, enabling you to recover the majority of lost or accidentally deleted photo and video files, even if the card has been corrupted

Great Compatibility And Reliability

To ensure compatibility with virtually all major camera manufacturers, as well as superb performance, Lexar memory cards are tested in the Lexar Quality Labs with over 800 digital cameras and memory card devices
Backed by a limited lifetime warranty and includes free dedicated professional technical support

Price: $399.95

Buy from BHPhoto

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Protect your credit and debit cards

January 7th, 2013 1 comment

 

You rarely let your credit card out of your sight, so how do bad guys get your credit card information? Some may get it from a friend waiting tables at a restaurant, but many credit card thieves get your card info using a device called a Credit Card Skimmer.

A credit card skimmer is a portable capture device that is attached in front of or on top of the legitimate scanner. The skimmer passively records the card data as you insert your credit card into the real scanner.

Measures to save from skimmers

ATM makers now offer better data protection through updated technology. For instance, some ATMs sink the keyboard to prevent spy cameras from seeing your PIN, or jiggle inserted cards to prevent skimmers.
If you suspect that an ATM might be compromised, don’t use the machine. Check the card slot by finger, if either anything comes loose or feels mismatched. If so, report the problem to the bank.

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  1. Inspect the card reader and the PIN pad.
  2. Trust your instincts, if doubt with the machine or people nearby try to use alternative machine.
  3. Keep an eye on your account, use Internet banking.
  4. Sign up for banking alerts like Mobile Banking which send transaction details via SMS.
  5. At abroad stay away from ATMs that appear dirty or in disrepair. At best, such ATMs may not work when used, and at worst, may be fake machines set up to capture card information.
  6. Do not use ATMs with unusual signage, such as a command to enter your PIN twice to complete a transaction.
  7. Watch out for ATMs that appear to have been altered. If anything on the front of the machine looks crooked, loose or damaged, it could be a sign that someone attached a skimming device.
  8. Avoid using the ATM if suspicious individuals are standing nearby. Criminals may try to distract you as you use the machine to steal your cash, or watch as you type your PIN.
  9. Be aware that if your card gets stuck in the machine and someone approaches to help, it may be a scam. A criminal may be trying to watch as you enter your PIN code.
  10. If your card gets stuck in the machine, call your Bank promptly to report the incident.
  11. As you key in your PIN, cover the keypad with your other hand to block anyone, or a camera, from viewing the numbers you type.
  12. Request to change PIN if you have any unusual activities, as in BML we cannot change it on our own.
Stil my question is by knowing all these I lost MVR 15,000 (over US$900) whether it’s been breached by the BANK or i miss handled it ?
“We have no option to change the BML Debit or Credit card PIN”

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